'Broken Places' Screening and Discussion
Oct
21
6:00 PM18:00

'Broken Places' Screening and Discussion

  • The New School Starr Foundation Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

BROKEN PLACES explores why some children are severely damaged by early adversity while others are able to thrive. By revisiting children the filmmakers profiled decades ago, BROKEN PLACES dramatically illustrates how early trauma shaped their lives as adults. BROKEN PLACES interweaves these longitudinal narratives with commentary from a few nationally renowned experts to help viewers better understand the devastating impact of childhood adversity as well as the inspiring characteristics of resilience.

"The message of Broken Places is clear. It says that toxic stress and its downstream consequences are costly. It calls us all to create better interventions based on this understanding. And for this reason, it is a powerful tool for good in strengthening the work of my organization and our partners." - Elisabeth D. Babcock, President and CEO, Economic Mobility Pathways.

The hour-long film will be followed by a discussion and Q&A with the filmmaker, participants from the film, and experts on children's well-being and trauma.

Moderated by: Kristin Morse, Director of Center for New York City Affairs, The New School

Guest Speakers:

  • Roger Weisberg, Writer/Producer/Director

  • Danny Jacob, featured in Academy-Award nominated documentary WHY CAN'T WE BE A FAMILY AGAIN

  • Raymond Jacob, featured in Academy-Award nominated documentary WHY CAN'T WE BE A FAMILY AGAIN

  • Keith Little, President & CEO SCO Family of Services

  • Rahil Briggs PsyD, the National Director of HealthySteps, a program of ZERO TO THREE

  • Daniella Rin Hover, Parent featured in BROKEN PLACES

Co-Sponsored by Citizens' Committee for Children

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Pushed to the Bottom: The Experience of Poverty in the United States
Mar
27
6:00 PM18:00

Pushed to the Bottom: The Experience of Poverty in the United States

  • The New School - Wolff Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Multidimensional Aspects of Poverty research, which was conducted from 2016 to 2019 in six areas across the United States, sought to determine the various aspects of poverty as lived by people in poverty. Based on an innovative approach, people in poverty, academics, and social workers teamed up to design and implement this project, and to analyze the data together.

The result is a groundbreaking new look at poverty in the United States. But it is just the beginning. Join us to learn more and to share your own thoughts and ideas.

Poverty is created by all of us. Together, we can end it.


6:00 - 7:00 p.m.: Presentations

7:00 - 8:00 p.m.: Wine and cheese reception and discussion


Speakers

Jessica Bartholow of the Western Center on Law & Poverty is a Policy Advocate with nearly two decades of experience in anti-poverty organizing, advocacy and program development at the local, state and national level. Jessica has co-authored several advocate and program guides and led a coalition to support the passage of several pieces of signed legislation that improve public benefits delivery, consumer protections and financial empowerment for low-income Americans. Jessica holds a Master’s Degree in Political Science and is the 2012 recipient of the Wellstone -Wheeler National Anti-Hunger Advocate of the Year Award.

Maryann Broxton of ATD Fourth World is co-director of the US MAP project. A Boston native and graduate of Lesley University, her first-hand experience of poverty has combined with her academic experience to give her a unique approach to the study of poverty in America.

Harvey Epstein, Assembly Member representing the East Side of Manhattan, including the neighborhoods of the Lower East Side, East Village, Alphabet City, Stuyvesant Town/Peter Cooper Village, Murray Hill, Tudor City and the United Nations. Harvey has been a public interest lawyer in New York City since graduating from CUNY Law School in 1994. He worked as a housing and economic development attorney both at the Legal Aid Society and Legal Services NYC and most recently at the Urban Justice Center. He has collaborated with dozens of community based organizations on economic, racial and social justice, Harvey has been at the forefront of critical economic development and housing issues. He has also worked tirelessly on dozens of pieces of legislation that have helped improve the lives of everyday New Yorkers. An experienced leader and advocate for the progressive movement, Harvey has introduced, voted for and supported legislation that protect tenants and preserve affordable housing in New York City, promote environmental sustainability,supports public education, voting reforms as well as criminal justice reform. He continues to advocate alongside the community to defend reproductive rights, implement gun control, and strengthen New York’s status as a sanctuary city. Harvey resides in the East Village with his wife, Anita; their children, Leila and Joshua; and their rescue-dog, Homer.

Ray Lopez is Director of Programs at Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Services. He oversees Nursing, Advocacy & Food Pantry, and Parenting & Child Development. As Director of Environmental Health Services, Ray leads a team of Community Health Workers who focus on asthma prevention using a holistic, hands-on approach which includes conducting home assessments, remediating asthma triggers, training households to improve housing conditions and developing community leaders. In partnership with the NY Academy of Medicine, Ray led a HUD-funded study to evaluate the asthma program which was published in the Environmental Justice journal in 2015. Ray is a leader with Metro IAF’s Manhattan Together, and their efforts achieved a landmark federal court settlement with the NYC Housing Authority, Baez v NYCHA, which aims to protect residents exposed to mold conditions that exacerbate asthma.

Alberto Minujin, is Founder and Executive Director of Equity for Children. Alberto Minujin is a professor at the Studley Graduate Program in International Affairs (SGPIA) housed at The Milano School at The New School, with a special focus on topics related to social policy and children’s rights. He serves as director of the School’s International Field Program (IFP) in Buenos Aires, Argentina and is a member of the Latin American Observatory (OLA). Until 2005, Professor Minujin was senior program officer for policy analysis in the Division of Policy and Planning of UNICEF Headquarters, New York. He operates a consultancy to UNICEF and other organizations worldwide. In 2010, Minujin was awarded the Argentina Bicentennial Medal in recognition of his contributions to the fields of child rights and social policy. He is the author of many books, articles and papers about child rights, social policy and the middle class.

Kimberly Tyre of ATD Fourth World is from New York and has struggled against poverty her whole life. A survivor of domestic violence with first-hand experience of the child welfare system, she is a passionate advocate for parents at risk of losing their children to foster care. Kimberly is a member of the Multidimensional Aspects of Poverty US national research team and recently received her BA.

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A People's Observance for a Just Future : 400 Years of Inequality
Mar
15
12:30 PM12:30

A People's Observance for a Just Future : 400 Years of Inequality

The 400 Years of Inequality National Organizing Committee invites you to "A People's Observance for a Just Future", a day of performance, reflection, and conversation on the 400 years since Africans were first brought to Jamestown in 1619 to be sold into bondage. In preparation for People's Observances across the nation in 2019, we gather to demonstrate the many forms an Observance can take.

Please join us starting at 12:30pm for a light lunch, a film screening, musical and movement performances, hands-on workshops and strategies for observing, and short presentations from scholars, planners, artists and culture makers.

Organize . Observe . Build

Join us March 15, 2019 from 12:30pm to 6:30pm at The New School

Wollman Hall, 65 W 11th St, Fifth Floor

New York, NY

-Reception to follow in Lang Cafe, 1st Floor-

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Brown Bag Talk with Maya Wiley: Census 2020
Mar
6
1:00 PM13:00

Brown Bag Talk with Maya Wiley: Census 2020

There is no function of government more central to democracy than the Census - from apportioning seats for public office to federal funding formulas and data for social scientists. The 2020 Census will be the first on-line Census. It is grossly underfunded and the federal administration in Washington has raised significant concerns for immigrants, legal residents and other vulnerable people. The New School’s Digital Equity Laboratory has been working on a project to support greater collaborative work between libraries, community leaders and city governments in the New York region to support a fair and safe Census.

Maya Wiley is the Senior Vice President for Social Justice at The New School, Henry Cohen Professor of Public and Urban Policy at Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment, and the co-founder and co-director of The New School’s Digital Equity Laboratory

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ITM Presents 'Prison in Twelve Landscapes'
Mar
5
6:00 PM18:00

ITM Presents 'Prison in Twelve Landscapes'

  • The New School University Center Starr Foundation Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join the Institute for Transformative Mentoring (ITM) for its 2nd Social Justice Movie Night featuring The Prison in Twelve Landscapes, a non-fiction film about prisons found in places we least expect to find them; from front yards to public spaces and even in social rituals of everyday life.

*Light refreshments will be available on a first come, first served basis.

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The Future of Rikers and the Inner Sound
Mar
4
8:30 AM08:30

The Future of Rikers and the Inner Sound

Introductions:

Ben “Cincere” Wilson, Institute of Transformative Mentoring at the New School

Judge Jonathan Lippman, Independent Commission on NYC Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform

Panelists:

Queens Council Member Costa Constantinides

Bronx Council Member Rafael Salamanca Jr.

Claire Weisz, WXY Studio

Description

New York City is pursuing an ambitious plan to shut down the jails on Rikers Island by reducing the number of people incarcerated and shifting to borough-based facilites that are closer to the city’s courthouses. Supporters believe that a smaller system will be more fair and just, and that borough facilities will be safer and more accessible to the courts, visitors, service providers, and attorneys. Opponents express concerns about the scope of the plan and the impact of the proposed borough facilities on their surroundings.

But the discussion over Rikers has not focused on the future of the island, which could be repurposed to provide lasting benefits to nearby communities and the entire region. Relocating facilities currently sited in the South Bronx and North Queens to Rikers would eliminate local sources of pollution, open up shorelines for park space, and create space for well-paid green industrial jobs. New waste water treatment facilities on Rikers could prevent 9 billion gallons of sewer overflow into the Long Island Sound every year. New sources of renewable energy could provide environmental, health, and financial benefits for residents across the region. And just as importantly, the opportunity to reimagine the South Bronx and North Queens coastlines could let local communities shape new positive visions for the area.

Join Regional Plan Association, the Independent Commission on Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform, and the Center for New York City Affairs to explore how New York City could be transformed by eliminating the jails on Rikers Island and repurposing it for public uses.

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Invisible Targets: Women and Drugs in the Criminal Justice System
Mar
1
4:00 PM16:00

Invisible Targets: Women and Drugs in the Criminal Justice System

  • The New School University Center - Room U L104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

What’s at stake for women involved with drugs?

In honor of International Women’s Day, the event series Dialogues on Drug Policy returns to The New School. The third installment in this series will explore the inequalities women face in the criminal justice system as a result of their involvement in drug-related economies, their drug use, or their dependence on drugs.

Women involved with drugs are routinely silenced by stigma. Due to current drug policies, these women face some of the harshest sentences for non-violent drug offenses. As a result, their liberty and rights to health and well-being, as well as their reproductive and parental rights are jeopardized.

Learn what’s at stake for women as the war on drugs continues to be waged and explore a question the prosecution often overlooks: why women become involved with drugs in the first place?

Opening Remarks will be given by Sakiko Fukuda-Parr from the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs at the New School. 

Moderated by Denise Tomasini-JoshiDivision Director, Health Law & Equality, Public Health Program, Open Society Foundations

Speakers:

The event will be live-streamed via the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs in International Affairs Facebook page.

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Timely Representation in Child Welfare
Feb
19
9:00 AM09:00

Timely Representation in Child Welfare

  • The New School, Starr Foundation Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us for our February Child Welfare Speaker Series panel on the topic of “Timely Representation.” The moment a child welfare agent knocks on a parent's door, anything the parent says or does can affect the outcome of their child welfare case. However, legal representation is not provided to families until after they have been interrogated and investigated. The panelists will discuss how this lack of legal support contributes to the high risk of separation families face and how early representation could prevent unnecessary trauma for children and their families.

Moderator:

  • Anastasia Rivera-Bonilla, Litigation supervisor, Center For Family Representation

Panelists:

  • Helen Montalvan, Parent advocate, Neighborhood Defender Services Harlem

  • Asia Pena, MSW, family defense Bronx Defenders

  • Nancy Fortunato, Parent Advocate, The Institute for Transformative Mentoring, JMacForFamilies

  • Nayiesha Terrell, Parent Advocate, The Institute for Transformative Mentoring, JMacForFamilies

The Child Welfare Speakers Series is organized by Joyce McMillan

This event is made possible by the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation

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Screening of 'Decade of Fire'
Feb
5
6:00 PM18:00

Screening of 'Decade of Fire'

  • The New School, Starr Foundation Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In the 1970s, the Bronx was on fire. Left unprotected by the city government, nearly a half-million people were displaced as their close-knit, multiethnic neighborhood burned, reducing the community to rubble. While insidious government policies caused the devastation, Black and Latino residents bore the blame. In this story of hope and resistance, Bronx native Vivian Vazquez exposes the truth about the borough’s sordid history and reveals how her embattled and maligned community chose to resist, remain and rebuild.

QA with the Film Producers will follow the movie screening:

  • Vivian Vazquez

  • Gretchen Hildebran

  • Neyda Martinez

*Light refreshments will be offered

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Preventive Services in NYC: Past, Present, and Future
Jan
30
8:30 AM08:30

Preventive Services in NYC: Past, Present, and Future

The forum will explore how preventive services have transformed the child welfare system and review the status of current preventive practices in combination with evidence-based interventions that will shape future services.

Join us as we reexamine our shared goal in Preventive Services in Child Welfare, to "make it as safe as possible for parents and families to seek and obtain the help that they need to protect children and stabilize families."

Panelists

  • David Hansell, Commissioner, ACS

  • Eric Brettschneider, 1st Deputy Commissioner, ACS

  • Dr. Jacqueline Martin, Deputy Commissioner, ACS

  • James Purcell, CEO, Council of Family and Child Caring Agencies

  • Dr. Julia Jean  Francois, SCO, Center for Family Life

  • Karen Dixon, ED, Harlem Dowling

  • Norma Martin, former ED, Brooklyn Community Services

  • Sister Paulette LoMonaco, ED, Good Shepherd Services

  • Ron Richter, CEO, Jewish Child Care Association

  • Sharmeela Mediratta, Vice President, Graham Windham

For additional event information, contact: Dr. Sophine Charles (scharles@cofcca.org) or call (212-929-2626).

Please contact Kamille Vargas (vargasks@newschool.edu or 212-229-5400 x2084) should you require reasonable accommodations for the event

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NYC Public Advocate Candidates Forum
Jan
23
6:00 PM18:00

NYC Public Advocate Candidates Forum

  • The Auditorium at The New School (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The job of the Public Advocate is to ensure that all New Yorkers receive the City services they deserve and have a voice in shaping the policies of our government.

Hear first hand from the candidates on issues YOU care about!

For more information please contact Cecilia Gentili at CeciliaG@gmhc.org or (212) - 367 -1587.

Organized by GMHC, the GMHC Consumer Advisory Board, the Milano School of Policy, Management, and Environment, and the Center for New York City Affairs at the New School.

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When Families Face Medically-Based Child Abuse Claims
Jan
22
9:00 AM09:00

When Families Face Medically-Based Child Abuse Claims

  • The New School, Starr Foundation Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The January Child Welfare Speaker Series event will explore the links between the child welfare and health care systems. What are the particular challenges faced by families navigating medically-based child abuse claims? Our presenter, Diane L. Redleaf, is the founder of the Chicago-based Family Defense Center and co-chairs United Family Advocates, a bi-partisan federal child welfare reform policy network. She will share insights from her new book, They Took the Kids Last Night: How the Child Protection System Puts Families at Risk, which documents how even the most well-meaning parents can end up on the wrong side of a child abuse allegation when their child has an injury or medical condition that gets misinterpreted.

Moderator:

  • Diane L. Redleaf, author, founder of the Family Defense Center, and co-chairs United Family Advocates

Panelists

  • Carolyn Kubitschek, child protection civil rights lawyer, New York City

  • Clara Presler, staff attorney, Bronx Defenders

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What’s the Status of Raise the Age and Is It What Reformers Intended?
Dec
6
9:00 AM09:00

What’s the Status of Raise the Age and Is It What Reformers Intended?

  • The New School Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

New York’s Raise the Age law went into effect on October 1. The law ended the State’s practice of automatically treating people as young as 16 as adults in the criminal justice system. It also required the City to move all 16- and 17-year-olds out of the Rikers Island jail. Advocates who fought for Raise the Age believed it would lead to a more humane system. But now, many fear that the brutal conditions of Rikers are being recreated in the facilities where young people are being held. Join representatives of the City, credible messenger service providers, and advocates to discuss the status of early implementation, challenges, and opportunities for restorative justice and support for young people.

Speakers include:

  • Antoinette Kennedy, Man Up Inc.

  • Cincere Wilson, Institute for Transformative Mentoring at the Center for New York City Affairs

  • Dana Kaplan, Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice

  • Felipe Franco, Administration for Children’s Services

  • Kate Rubin, Youth Represent-Marcus Campbell, Raise the Age Implementation Board

  • Shanduke McPhatter, Gangstas Making Astronomical Community Changes Inc.

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Cradle to Grave Economic Security: Key Issues, Bold Options
Dec
4
6:00 PM18:00

Cradle to Grave Economic Security: Key Issues, Bold Options

A panel discussion featuring Darrick Hamilton (The New School), Chris Hughes (The Economic Security Project), Lynn Parramore (Institute for New Economic Thinking), and L. Randall Wray (Levy Economics Institute). The panel will address the “big economic ideas” of federal job guarantees, student loan debt amnesty, guaranteed income, and baby bonds.

In today’s economic climate, there is a new found urgency in these ideas. This panel will focus on the economic rights and policies needed to build a movement with the hope of creating a world with social equity and economic inclusion.

This event is co-sponsored by Milano School for Policy, Management, and Environment, The New School for Social Research, and the Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at NSSR.

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The Impact of the SCR: Exploring the Consequences of Being on the SCR and the Need for Reform
Nov
20
9:00 AM09:00

The Impact of the SCR: Exploring the Consequences of Being on the SCR and the Need for Reform

  • The New School University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for our monthly installment of the Child Welfare Speaker Series.

The State Central Registry (SCR) has disproportionate negative effects on low-income women of color. The panelists will discuss the consequences of the SCR and highlight proposed legislation aimed at improving family outcomes.

Moderator

Dionna King, Policy Manager, Drug Policy Alliance

Panelists

  • Joyce McMillan, visiting fellow Center for New York City Affairs, Family Coordinator Sinergia, Parent advocate

  • Chris Gottlieb, Adjunct Professor of Clinical Law; Co-Director, NYU Family Defense Clinic

  • Fallon Speaker, J.D, Attorney - Bronx Defenders

  • Angeline Montauban, Educator, Parent Advocate

Please contact Kamille Vargas (kamille.vargas@newschool.edu) should you require reasonable accommodations for the event

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Reimagining Justice: NYC Without Rikers Island
Nov
15
9:00 AM09:00

Reimagining Justice: NYC Without Rikers Island

  • The New School University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With the impending closing of Rikers Island, this conference will bring together community members, service providers, academics, and policy makers to identify and work on the policy and programmatic solutions needed to reimagine a justice system that centers healthy individuals, families, and communities. This conference will look at people, policy, and place, with a focus upon the structural policies regarding incarceration and the community based support required for justice and healing. The New School will serve as both a laboratory to test and advance collaborative work, as well as a support to existing efforts throughout New York City. The conference will be action oriented to ensure that the knowledge produced and shared will lead to actionable initiatives and progress toward a more just NYC.

Featured speakers include:

Jennifer Jones Austin, Chief Executive Officer & Executive Director, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies

Mark Gardner, Director, Parsons School of Design, The New School

Dana Kaplan, Deputy Director, NYC Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice

Ana L. Oliveira, President & CEO, New York Women’s Foundation

Lilliam Barios Paoli, (former) NYC Deputy Mayor

Maya Wiley, Henry Cohen Professor, Senior Vice President for Social Justice, The New School

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ITM Social Justice Movie Screening - Killing Beef
Nov
13
6:00 PM18:00

ITM Social Justice Movie Screening - Killing Beef

  • The New School University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join the Institute for Transformative Mentoring (ITM) for its final installment of 2018's Social Justice Movie Night series. ITM will be screening, Samson Styles' documentary Killing Beef.

After a near-fatal shooting, Styles makes the attempt to find life's meaning, as well as, navigate the process of reconciliation with his shooter.

If you are interested in joining us and are in need of reasonable accommodations for the evening, please, let us know.

*Light refreshments will be served.

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An introduction to NYC public schools
Oct
22
9:30 AM09:30

An introduction to NYC public schools

  • The New School's Theresa Lang Community & Student Center, Arnhold Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Clara Hemphill, founder of InsideSchools and author of New York City’s Best Public Pre-K and Elementary Schools. We'll highlight some undiscovered gems and walk you through the pre-kindergarten and kindergarten application process.

We'll also show you the NEW InsideSchools search tool for 3K, the city's free pre-school programs for 3-year-olds.

Clara and the InsideSchools staff will tackle these topics and more:

  • What's the difference between childcare and pre-kindergarten?

  • What should I look for when I visit?

  • How do I decide between progressive vs. traditional?

  • What about gifted programs, charters and other options?

  • How and when do I apply?

A 1-hour presentation will be followed by Q & A. Children are welcome.

The access to the event is free, but if you want a copy of our book: New York City’s Best Public Pre-K and Elementary Schools, 4th Edition, you should buy a $25 ticket. This essential guide is based on visits made by the InsideSchools staff to more than 150 public schools in all five boroughs.

InsideSchools.org is a project of The Center for New York City Affairs, an applied policy research institute based at the Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy.

InsideSchools is proud to partner with Bowery Babes to offer this workshop. Bowery Babes is a 3,000+ member downtown NYC nonprofit mothers group dedicated to supporting women from pregnancy through the early years of motherhood and beyond.

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LAUNCH PARTY: Homeboy Came to Orange: A Story of People's Power
Oct
17
4:00 PM16:00

LAUNCH PARTY: Homeboy Came to Orange: A Story of People's Power

  • The New School - Dorothy Hirshon Suite (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please celebrate with us the launch of Homeboy Came To Orange: A Story of People's Power, written by Milano faculty Dr. Mindy Thompson Fullilove and her late father, union organizer Ernest Thompson.

Join us for excerpt readings, book signing, and light refreshments.

Homeboy Came to Orange tells a story of building people's power through coalition. In today's fractured political and social landscape, we need now more than ever a primer on coalition to repair and reinvigorate our democracy.

This event is part of the 400 Years of Inequality 2018 Curriculum Disruption. 400 Years of Inequality asks organizers to read three books; one of these is Homeboy Came to Orange.
"Despite 50th anniversary stories on the Civil Rights movement and new African-American history museums, many stories of African-Americans overcoming urban racism in the North remain little known. That makes this book on Ernest Thompson, a great community and social justice organizer, particularly important." -Randy Shaw

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The Impact of NYCHA Conditions on Health, Education, and Child Welfare
Oct
16
9:00 AM09:00

The Impact of NYCHA Conditions on Health, Education, and Child Welfare

  • The New School - University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hazardous living conditions for NYCHA residents affect not only the quality of life and health for children, but also negatively impact the ability of families to stay together. Join activists, advocates and NYCHA residents to discuss how living in public housing affects child welfare involvement and identify community-driven strategies to promote change. Our guests include:

Moderator: Cindy Bautista-Thomas, Columbia University School of Social Work

Panelists:

  • Ray Lopez, Director of Programs and Director of Environmental Health, Little Sisters of the Assumption

  • Michele Holmes, Housing Activist and NYCHA resident

  • Steven Goodman, Founding Director, Educational Video Center

Please contact Kamille Vargas (vargasks@newschool.edu) should you require reasonable accommodations for the event.

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Addressing Inclusion Among Children & Adolescents Living in Poverty
Oct
11
1:45 PM13:45

Addressing Inclusion Among Children & Adolescents Living in Poverty

  • The New School Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join us in the upcoming conference organized by Equity for Children, in collaboration with members of the Global Coalition to End Child Poverty: the Comparative Research Programme on Poverty (CROP), UNICEF, SOS Children’s Villages and the ChildFund Alliance. Top experts from this organizations will participate in two panels followed by a Q&A session. The first one will be on measuring inclusion, urban inequalities and counting “invisible children” who are not covered in standard surveys, and the second, on prevention of violence against children and adolescents through youth participation, programs and policies. A reception will follow.

Livestream

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ITM Meets Creatively Speaking
Oct
9
6:00 PM18:00

ITM Meets Creatively Speaking

The Institute for Transformative Mentoring (ITM) is partnering with Creatively Speaking for the second installment of its Social Justice Movie Night Series.

Please, join us for an evening of independent short films and a discussion related to social justice.

Film Lineup

  • Every Mother's Son: Filmmaker Tami Gold, tells the story of 3 women that lost their sons to police brutality. Due to their experiences, the women now advocate for change.

  • Additional films to be announced


If you are interested in joining us and are in need of reasonable accommodations for the evening, please, let us know.

*Light refreshments will be served.

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Speaker Series Sequel - School to Child Welfare/Prison Pipeline
Sep
18
9:00 AM09:00

Speaker Series Sequel - School to Child Welfare/Prison Pipeline

  • Eugene Lang Building, 5th Floor (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The school-to-prison pipeline is the disproportionate tendency of children of color to become incarcerated or placed in foster care because of harsh educational, discipline, and policing policies and practices.

Join us for a discussion on the impacts and uneven application of school disturbance laws, zero tolerance policies, and school reporting of absences (educational neglect). We will also discuss alternatives based in restorative practices that have the potential to deepen children's engagement with their education rather than disrupting it.

Moderator: Caroline Preston, Senior Editor, The Hechinger Report

Panelists: 

  • Pamela Price-Haynes, principal, Don Pedro Albizu Campos School
  • Gloria Alfinez, parent advocate
  • Roy Waterman, Criminal Justice Project Manager, Jewish Council for Public Affairs

Please contact Kamille Vargas (vargasks@newschool.edu should you require reasonable accommodations for the event

This event is made possible by the DeCamp Foundation

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Automating Inequality in Child Welfare using Predictive Analytics
Jul
17
9:00 AM09:00

Automating Inequality in Child Welfare using Predictive Analytics

  • New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Moderator: Martha Raimon, Senior Associate, Center for the Study of Social Change

Panelists:

  • Andrew White, Deputy Commissioner, ACS

  • Luke Gerber, Action Research Partners

  • Richard Wexler, Executive Director - National Coalition for Child Protection Reform (NCCPR)

  • Virginia Eubanks, Author, Automating Inequality and Professor at University of Albany

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The Right to Counsel in New York City
Jun
20
9:30 AM09:30

The Right to Counsel in New York City

The Right to Counsel in New York City: A Panel Discussion about Victory, Opportunities and Challenges for Tenant Organizing in NYC and Beyond

In a single year, landlords try to evict close to a million people in New York City through the housing court system. Historically, the vast majority of tenants did not have legal representation in housing court. The opposite has been true for landlords who are almost always represented by an attorney. Data shows that at least half of the tenants who are evicted each year could remain in their homes if they had legal representation.

The Right to Counsel NYC Coalition formed to change this power dynamic, which leads not only to evictions, but also to displacement, gentrification and the loss of affordable housing. In 2014, the Right to Counsel Bill (Intro 214) was introduced in New York City Council in order to establish a city-funded right to counsel for low-income tenants facing eviction proceedings. Three years later, the RTCNYC Coalition won an amazing victory making NYC the first City in the nation to establish a right to counsel for tenants facing eviction. Over the next 5 years, this new right will be phased in and many questions remain about how the new right will be implemented.

This panel will focus on the community and tenant driven organizing campaign to win the Right to Counsel in New York City and also examine how this model is scalable to other cities across the country. This panel will explore impacts of policy change that is rooted in community organizing and also look at how those that are affected by the policy can help shape the implementation. The panel will also explore how NYC can be a national model for other cities.

Panelists Include:

  • Susanna Blankley, Right to Counsel Coalition Coordinator (Moderator)

  • Lorena Lopez, Tenant Organizer at Catholic Migration Services

  • Randy Dillard, NYC Tenant, Member of Community Action for Safe Apartments (CASA)

  • Marika Dias, Housing Attorney, Director of Tenant Rights Coalition, Legal Services NYC

  • Maria Lopez-Nunez, Community Organizer, Ironbound Community Corporation, Newark, NJ

Co-sponsored by the Center for New York City Affairs at the New School, The Right to Counsel Coalition and the Community Development Project at the Urban Justice Center

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Lack of Services for Families with Disabilities
Jun
12
9:00 AM09:00

Lack of Services for Families with Disabilities

  • New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

New York City’s Administration for Children’s Services (ACS) is currently being sued in federal court for failing to provide adequate services to parents with intellectual disabilities. Nationwide, parents with disabilities are more likely to have their children removed by child welfare agencies than parents without disabilities. Rather than being referred to resources that could support them in their parenting, parents with disabilities are too often separated from their children based on assumptions about what they can and cannot do. This panel will discuss these trends and the kinds of supports and services ACS could provide to strengthen families and keep them together.

Moderator: Emma Baber-Kessler, LCSW, Sinergia

Panelists:

  • Donald Lash, Executive Director Sinergia, Author "When the Welfare People Come"

  • Lauren Shapiro, Director of Brooklyn Defender Services, Family Defense Practice

  • Thalia Julme, Staff Attorney at New York Legal Assistance Group

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Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools
Jun
5
5:00 PM17:00

Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools

The Center for New York City Affairs and the NYC Alliance for School Integration and Desegregation (ASID) invites you to Dare to Reimagine Integration for New York City’s Public Schools. After one year of research and extensive collaboration, ASID is excited to share its policy agenda with parents, students, educators, advocates, and allies who demand a more equitable school system for all of our children.

Join ASID for an opportunity to learn more about ASID’s vision and how you can play a pivotal role in tackling the entrenched divide that has separated New York City’s children for too long. #StillNotEqual

Reception to follow immediately afterward.

Want to get started supporting real school integration in NYC right away? Sign our petition demanding the NYC Department of Education to create an Office of School Integration and Equity.

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Parallels between Mass Incarceration and Foster Care
May
15
9:00 AM09:00

Parallels between Mass Incarceration and Foster Care

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel will examine the resemblance between the mass incarceration system and the child welfare system. Both systems tout a protective function but end up tearing families and communities apart. The panelists will examine the meaning of truly protecting children, questioning not only the similarities between the two systems but the disproportionate number of children of color who are separated from their families, communities and all they are familiar with. For years we have been speaking about “the new Jim Crow”; some are now referring to the foster care system as Jim’s twin sibling, “the new Jane Crow.”

Panelists

  • Tasheva Gadson, former foster child

  • Gerald Campbell, former foster child, scholar of the Institute for Transformative Mentoring

  • Andrea Morrell professor, Guttman College

Moderator

  • Shanelle Matthews, activist-in-residence, The New School, former communications director, Black Lives Matter
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Book Launch: Neighborhood Success Stories by Carol Lamberg
May
7
6:00 PM18:00

Book Launch: Neighborhood Success Stories by Carol Lamberg

Join Milano as Carol Lamberg launches her new book, Neighborhood Success Stories: Creating and Sustaining Affordable Housing in New York. A long-time leader of New York City’s affordable housing movement, Carol was Executive Director from 1983 until 2014 of the Settlement Housing Fund, one of the city’s largest and most innovative sponsors of affordable housing. Part memoir, part policy analysis, Neighborhood Success Stories distills key lessons for building and managing affordable housing. Carol reflects on the social purpose, vision, and practical challenges of the projects she’s been involved in, while vividly capturing the life and times of those who engaged in the creation and maintenance of housing and those who have benefited from it.

“Carol Lamberg knows her stuff, and she shares it all in this book. It’s a testament to her decades-long struggle to create affordable housing in New York City by any means necessary—one that has great relevance today, even as federal support for housing programs has dwindled to a trickle.”
Gale A. Brewer, Manhattan Borough President

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Tough Calculations: What is a College Worth?
May
3
9:00 AM09:00

Tough Calculations: What is a College Worth?

  • The New School - Theresa Lang Student Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Choosing the right college has never been easy. But today the stakes feel higher than ever. College cost and debt is rising. Many schools have poor graduation rates or do little to help students find jobs. And the economy is changing at a breakneck pace. How can students and families decide which institution will offer the greatest return for their hard-earned tuition dollars?

Join the Center for New York City Affairs for a discussion on the latest tools for calculating the true value of a school. What factors should students consider in developing a college list? Are on-line sites and rankings helpful? And how can all of this information be used to make our higher education system more responsive to the needs of students?

Keynote Presentation by Kaitlin Mulhere, special projects and college rankings editor, Money Magazine

Kaitlin Mulhere will then join in a discussion with:

  • David Helene, co-founder of Edquity, an on-line college financial
    planning tool

  • Khushboo Jamal, Brooklyn College graduate & CUNY Tech Fellow

  • Angie Kamath, university dean for continuing education and workforce development, CUNY

  • Sonia Szymanski, co-director of college inquiry, College Access: Research and Action (CARA)

Moderated by Kim Nauer, education research director, Center for New York City Affairs, The New School

Event is free to attend but registration is required.

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School Choice and Integration in NYC
May
2
9:00 AM09:00

School Choice and Integration in NYC

Forty percent of New York City kindergartners take advantage of school choice to enroll in schools other than their zoned neighborhood school. What does this mean for the children who choose, and what does it mean for the schools they leave behind?

Senior research fellow Nicole Mader of the New School's Center for New York City Affairs will present her research findings, based on student-level zone assignment data for 700,000 pupils over 10 years.

School choice has allowed thousands of children to leave low-performing schools for higher performing schools, often outside their neighborhoods. But it has also resulted in higher concentrations of poverty and shrinking enrollments and budgets in the schools they leave behind, making it ever hard for those schools to serve their neighborhoods well.

The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion including:

  • NYS Board of Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa
  • New School Professor Maya Wiley, co-chair of the city's school diversity working group
  • Dennis Morgan, PTA president of PS 180 in Harlem and a member of the Community Education Council for District 3.
  • Allison Roda, author of Inequity in Gifted and Talented Programs: Parental Choices about Status, School Opportunity, and Second-Generation Segregation.
  • Ujju Aggarwal, New School professor and author of the forthcoming book The Color of Choice: Raced Rights and the Structure of Citizenship

Clara Hemphill, director of education policy and editor of InsideSchools, will moderate.

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